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Thursday, May 12, 2016

The Billion Dollar Question

Call it cold feet, a political spin on buyer's remorse or sober second thoughts but Hamilton City Council is undeniably questioning itself on the LRT issue.

With a billion dollars on the line, the mere fact that a vote is being planned for councillors to put there support for LRT on record, signals  a potential fracturing of the degree of support for what amounts to the biggest transformation being contemplated for Hamilton in recent history. 

Prior to the notion of a vote being called. The Hamiltonian published an article outlining the political perils of a transformation initiative. You can read that article by clicking here.

While there is a detectable sense of frustration from Mayor Eisenberger, the LRT question may once again become an open wound. And with a voter turn out of just 34.02% in the 2016 election, politicians may rightfully be leery about where the will of the people can truly be mined.

Stay tuned as the billion dollar question continues to be churned.


10 comments:

  1. AnonymousMay 12, 2016

    To me it only makes sense if it goes from Mac to winona. If not font bother fix the bus lines

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  2. Sammy has finished with the insults and has now moved on to threats in his ongoing effort to spread harmony and goodwill across our fine City. The knives are out now, stay tuned while this unravels as it should.

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  3. The fact that a vote is being called, says it all. This version of Hamilton City Council is ill equipped for this kind of decision making. I think they should cancel this lRT stuff and negotiate with the province to secure these funds for an upgrade to our existing modes of public transit- which is far more flexible than digging up our infrastructure and alienating drivers.
    Sorce

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    Replies
    1. AnonymousMay 16, 2016

      Within the GTHA, the funds have been specifically dedicated to higher-order transit. If the City wants a raise in allowance that's another matter entirely, but they're unlikely to get the province to undermine a 25-year infrastructure strategy by kowtowing to the sulky theatrics of municipal pols like Clrs Collins and Whitehead. This is about a vision longer than four-year increments. In 2015, the Ontario government chose to dedicate $16.5B to rapid transit and regional rail expansion inside the GTHA and $15B into local infrastructure projects outside of the GTHA. Council can decline $1B for higher order transit but they can’t reallocate those funds as they please. http://www.fin.gov.on.ca/en/budget/ontariobudgets/2015/ch1b.html#ch1b_3

      Delete
  4. Marvin RyderMay 13, 2016

    I believe Sam's move is only 50% about taking the temperature of City Council and re-confirming the desire to build the LRT. The other half of his motivation is to take this re-affirmation and seek guarantees from the province that the funding will not be in jeopardy if there is a change in governing party in the 2018 provincial election. His "dream" is to have the province transfer the billion to Metrolinx before the election to make it untouchable. I doubt the province will agree to a financial transfer but it might offer another form of guarantee to Hamilton citizens.

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    Replies
    1. AnonymousMay 16, 2016

      I think what has happened is that a select group people, organized relentlessly to convince the governments that Hamilton is screaming for LRT. That just is not the case across the city. I won't vote for Terry Whitehead again if he falls for this mumbo jumbo and votes in favor of going forward with LRT.

      Delete
  5. BlackmanMay 15, 2016

    Is there a proven need and demand for this project with some hard numbers or are we embarking on a white elephant?
    Should there not be a short LRT route first from say Limeridge Mall to downtown and Mac to downtown?
    With our aging society, more retired people,less working people, where is the daily ridership going to come from?
    Can any one help with some answers?

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    Replies
    1. AnonymousMay 16, 2016

      We are embarking on a white elephant.

      Delete
    2. AnonymousMay 16, 2016

      Where is the ridership going to come from? The area that's growing ridership numbers at four times the HSR average: The B-Line Corridor.

      King Street Transit Only Lane Pilot Project (PW110 - 8.3 PW11079(g).doc

      “The most recent ridership counts for the Main-King-Queenston corridor suggest that transit ridership along the corridor has grown by approximately 20% over five years (2009 to 2014), or an average of about 4% per year. Ridership in the Main-King-Queenston corridor accounts for approximately 42% of the system wide ridership. Between 2009 and 2013 transit ridership across the HSR system grew by 4% (from 20,930,770 to 21,817,842), an average of approximately 1% per year. Based on the data, the Main-King-Queenston corridor carries a significant proportion of transit ridership in the City and ridership in this corridor is growing at a faster rate than the overall system. There is evidence that, from a transit ridership perspective, greater investment in this corridor is warranted.”

      http://hamilton.siretechnologies.com/sirepub/agdocs.aspx?doctype=agenda&itemid=5285

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  6. AnonymousMay 15, 2016

    @Blackson. Here is the economic impact report of the A line: https://www.hamilton.ca/sites/default/files/media/browser/2015-09-18%2009%3A10/lrt-submission-book9-economic-potential-impact-report.pdf
    > and here is the report for the BLine: https://d3fpllf1m7bbt3.cloudfront.net/sites/default/files/media/browser/2015-09-17%2012%3A09/lrt-submission-book5-phasing-evaluation-technical-report.pdf
    There are also many many detailed reports on the city of Hamilton website including the city's request in February 2013 for the province to pay for the BLine

    ReplyDelete

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